Pink Martini – joy music

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Meet legendary and tireless Pink Martini with the only concert in Israel! On July 18 on the stage of Tel Aviv “Angara11” this famous small orchestra will perform under the direction of its permanent conductor, pianist Thomas Lauderdale, with the participation of vocalists China Forbes and Storm Large.

They perform on all continents, mix genres and musical styles, make unexpected covers of famous melodies. As part of the orchestra – musicians from the USA, Bulgaria, Cuba, Greece. They sing in 25 languages ​​– and also in Hebrew. Each language turns for them into one of the musical instruments that adds color. “Pink Martini – it’s a worldwide musical adventure” says Thomas Lauderdale
Pink Martini’s only concert: July 18, Hangar 11 Hall, Tel Aviv. Order tickets https://bit.ly/38w1bo4

It all started in 1994 in Portland, Oregon, where Thomas Lauderdale, 24, a history and literature major at Harvard, decided to get into politics. The goal was to run for president, so the young politician started attending every political meeting he could find. But since Thomas was also a classically trained pianist, he couldn’t help but notice that some sort of faded music was playing at all of these gatherings.

Lauderdale decided to correct this situation and in the same year he assembled a group he called Pink Martini – for speeches at political and social events. There, he believed, beautiful and moving music should sound like Democrats and Republicans alike would like. So Lauderdale began to create numbers, inspired by music from different eras, countries and genres: jazz and classical, Latin and pop, folk, rock and roll, etc.
A group of four musicians began to speak at meetings on important social topics – civil rights, affordable housing, ecology, education, etc.
They quickly became popular. A year later, China Forbes, a former classmate of Thomas at Harvard, joined Pink Martini. They started writing songs together. Their very first song “Sympathique” (I don’t want to work) became an overnight sensation in France. The line “I don’t want to work!” The French still sing during strikes today.
Over time, the number of musicians reached 12, and the group turned into a small orchestra. In 1997 they made their European debut at the Cannes Film Festival and in 1998 they made their first appearance with the Oregon Symphony Orchestra. Since then, the group has performed with over 70 orchestras worldwide, including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony Orchestra and BBC Concert Orchestra at Albert Hall.

    Pink Martini – music of joy

Their concert history includes annual sales at Carnegie Hall and the Sydney Opera House, the Montreal Jazz Festival and the Olympia in Paris. However, Pink Martini continues to play at the most important public events: for example, the opening of the reconstructed Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s 100th anniversary party in 2018; Governor’s Ball at the 80th Annual Academy Awards in 2008, etc.
Feature Pink Martini – in the ability to create incredible musical intersections and blends. With the arrival of rock star Storm Large, the band has even more room to experiment. They cooperate with a large number of musicians from different countries. Latin classics, Japanese bossa nova, folk pop hits, Lauderdale’s ironic arrangements are always unexpected. (By the way, he still performs occasionally as a concert pianist with his native Oregon Symphony Orchestra.)
The group has released over a dozen albums on their own Heinz label, with around 3 million copies sold.
But the main thing that remains unchanged is that Pink Martini continues to create music that appeals to liberals and democrats, left and right, intellectuals and the general public. Because it is music of pure joy.
Pink Martini’s only concert: 18.07, Hangar 11 Hall, Tel Aviv. Order tickets
https://bit.ly/38w1bo4

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Natasha Kumar

About the author of the article

Natasha Kumar

Natasha Kumar has been a reporter at the news desk since 2018. Prior to that, she wrote about early adolescence and family dynamics for Styles and was a legal affairs correspondent for the Metro bureau. Prior to joining The Times Hub, Natasha Kumar worked as an editor at the Village Voice and as a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella. To get in touch contact me via my natasha@timeshub.in

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